StoneBridge’s ‘Mama India‘ [Reloaded] Mix Is Taking The World By Storm

‘Mama India‘ [Reloaded] is absolutely dominating the current music landscape

StoneBridge‘s ‘Mama India‘ [Reloaded] Mix Is Taking The World By Storm

The hard-hitting track called ‘Mama India‘ currently making its way around the world, and will come out shortly on Area 51 Records. As one of the biggest stars in electronic dance music, StoneBridge‘s ‘Mama India‘ [Reloaded] Mix has become an absolute DJ sensation in United Kingdom and is spreading like fire over the rest of the world. “Already off to a brilliant start, we already have 78% of the DJs fully supporting the ‘Mama India‘ StoneBridge Remixes,” said Mark Loverush, an independent promoter from the Power Group in United Kingdom.

‘Mama India‘ Brings Real Electronic Dance Music Into The Forefront

The track is built around a highly recognizable sample of “Mama India,” a fittingly mysterious offering from dance-music futurists Stevo and DJ Delani, and was produced in the earlier version together with the German music-producer legend Klaus Munzert.  In the wake of the smash-hit that StoneBridge’s ‘Mama India‘ [Reloaded] Mix became, the track is absolutely dominating the current music landscape, as ‘Mama India‘ brings real electronic dance music into the forefront, and distributes the beats of the club scene to radio.

Funky House Beats & Heavy Basslines

The top oriental melodic piece has remained a classic in the world of electronic dance music. The Swedish producer’s use of the haunting vocals of the underground hit ‘Mama India‘ perfected the track, and ultimately, resulted in a true masterpiece. The original version of ‘Mama India’ was the world´s first orient techno-house genre track released as a single but ‘Mama India,‘ still bangs. It’s an combination of funky house beats, and heavy basslines. No one has connected house music beats to tabla samples like this, and for sure none of them hit harder than StoneBridge’s ‘Mama India‘ [Reloaded] Mix with its delirious vocal sample.

NEW YORK (RichTVX.com) – StoneBridge’s ‘Mama India‘ [Reloaded] Mix stands out amidst its uplifting house beats, and it morphs into the Swedish producer’s signature prog-house sound. It’s nearly impossible to pin down StoneBridge’s most iconic tune. Is it ‘Show Me Love’ one of the biggest selling house tracks of all time? ‘Put ‘Em High’ (feat. Therese)? Or is his most enduring anthem this ‘Mama India‘ [Reloaded] Mix? The track is probably purest representation of electronic dance music’s injection into orient genre (and vice versa).

Swedish Superstar DJ StoneBridge

StoneBridge can be found on the worldwide musical mainstream map with his acclaimed remix work for artists such as Robin S, Sia, Usher, Missy Elliott, Britney Spears, Taio Cruz and Ne-Yo. With a constant flow of new projects, the studio work will not be slowing down any time soon.

StoneBridge’s music is regularly chalking up playlist support across radio networks around the globe, including BBC Radio 1, Sirius XM & Kiss FM. Stone Bridge hosts his own weekly #bpmMix radio show on Sirius XM/BPM. A Show which broadcasts to millions every Saturday throughout North America. Holding down a residency on Sirius XM/BPM means his name has become synonymous with Saturday night dance music around the world. Alongside Sirius XM/BPM, he also produces the weekly syndicated StoneBridge HKJ show. These broadcasts really allow StoneBridge to stay at the top of his game in today’s fast moving, ever changing music scene.

Throughout 2019 StoneBridge has been rocking sets all around the world, from Ibiza to Dubai for the successful Hedkandi 20th Anniversary tour as well as a headline booking at the Sunsetter Festival in Auckland, New Zealand February 2020 and headlining alongside Todd Terry on Prestfest 2021 in the UK.

Electronic Dance Music 

Electronic dance music (EDM), also known as dance musicclub music, or simply dance, is a broad range of percussive electronic music genres made largely for nightclubsraves and festivals. It is generally produced for playback by DJs who create seamless selections of tracks, called a mix, by segueing from one recording to another. EDM producers also perform their music live in a concert or festival setting in what is sometimes called a live PA.

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, following the emergence of ravingpirate radios and an upsurge of interest in club culture, EDM achieved widespread mainstream popularity in Europe. In the United States at that time, acceptance of dance culture was not universal; although both electro and Chicago house music were influential both in Europe and the United States, mainstream media outlets and the record industry remained openly hostile to it. There was also a perceived association between EDM and drug culture, which led governments at state and city level to enact laws and policies intended to halt the spread of rave culture

Subsequently, in the new millennium, the popularity of EDM increased globally, largely in Australia and the United States. By the early 2010s, the term “electronic dance music” and the initialism “EDM” was being pushed by the American music industry and music press in an effort to rebrand American rave culture. Despite the industry’s attempt to create a specific EDM brand, the initialism remains in use as an umbrella term for multiple genres, including dance-pophousetechnotrancedrum and bassdubstephardstyle, and trap, as well as their respective subgenres.

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